Adult Summer Reading: Week 6

by West Bend Library on 2022-07-11 08:00:00

Welcome back to Week 6 of our adult summer reading digital displays! If you’re new to Read Beyond the Beaten Path, check out our Week 1 post here. You can also download a reading log, get more information about the program and prizes, or sign up to complete the program on Beanstack. Reminder that these posts only pertain to the adult reading program — come visit us to learn more about the youth reading program!

Completed paper reading logs (at least five books read from five categories) can be returned to the Reference Desk beginning today, July 11, until Tuesday, August 2. If you're completing the program on Beanstack, earning the "Summer Reading Champ" badge by logging five books means you've completed the program!

This week’s displays are all about books that have been banned or challenged and memoirs written by women. According to the American Library Association's Freedom to Read Statement, "No art or literature can flourish if it is to be measured by the political views or private lives of its creators. No society of free people can flourish that draws up lists of writers to whom it will not listen, whatever they may have to say." This statement applies to both the banned and challenged books and the memoirs listed below, and the overlap between the two categories is often wide-ranging. We're here to provide access to these materials during Read Beyond the Beaten Path and all year long!

Next to each book is its catalog entry (so you can put it on hold), a link to a summary of the book, and where you can find it as an e-book or e-audiobook, if applicable — Libby (L) and/or Hoopla (H).

Banned or Challenged

A graphic showing the covers of Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe, Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison, All Boys Aren't Blue by George M. Johnson, Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez, and The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. There is also a quote from the American Library Association's 2021 most challenged books list that says, Library staff in every state faced an unprecedented number of attempts to ban books. ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 729 challenges to library, school and university materials and services in 2021, resulting in more than 1,597 individual book challenges or removals. Most targeted books were by or about Black or LGBTQIA+ persons.

(L = Libby, H = Hoopla)

Fiction

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison
( catalog entry | summary | H )

Looking for Alaska by John Green
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
( catalog entry | summary | L )

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult
( catalog entry | summary | L )

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely
( catalog entry | summary | L )

This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Nonfiction

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
( catalog entry | summary  )

This Book is Gay by Juno Dawson
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

All Boys Aren't Blue by George M. Johnson
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

BONUS: The American Library Association released its list of the Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2021 during National Library Week on April 4, 2022.

Memoirs Written by Women

A graphic showing the covers of Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, Know My Name by Chanel Miller, and Hunger by Roxane Gay. Photos of the authors accompany each cover.

(L = Libby, H = Hoopla)

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Funny in Farsi by Firoozen Dumas
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Somebody's Daughter: A Memoir by Ashley C. Ford
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Woman Who Watches Over the World by Linda Hogan
( catalog entry | summary  )

Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison by Piper Kerman
( catalog entry | summary | L )

H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Know My Name by Chanel Miller
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Redefining Realness by Janet Mock
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Becoming by Michelle Obama
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
( catalog entry | summary  )

Just Kids by Patti Smith
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward
( catalog entry | summary | L )

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai
( catalog entry | summary | L )


Next week, our summer reading displays will focus on those high-profile books you may have heard of from the New York Times Best Seller List and that have been nominated for or won National Book Awards. Happy reading!