Adult Summer Reading: Week 8

by West Bend Library on 2022-07-25 08:00:00

Welcome back to Week 8 of our adult summer reading digital displays! If you’re new to Read Beyond the Beaten Path, check out our Week 1 post here. You can also download a reading log, get more information about the program and prizes, or sign up to complete the program on Beanstack. But hurry — the adult reading program ends on Tuesday, August 2! Reminder that these posts only pertain to the adult reading program — come visit us to learn more about the youth reading program (which ends on Friday, July 29)!

Completed paper reading logs (at least five books read from five categories) can be returned to the Reference Desk until Tuesday, August 2. If you're completing the program on Beanstack, earning the "Summer Reading Champ" badge by logging five books means you've completed the program!

This week's display is all about books we've always wanted to read. Who's "we"? Well, for your purposes, it's you — now's the time to read that book you've been putting off for years (or since you saw it on a best seller list, or since you learned about it on TV, or since you were supposed to read it in high school but didn't). If you were looking for a sign to get started, this is it!

But this week, the library staff are also sharing our own literary white whales: books we've wanted to read for any length of time, but for whatever reason, haven't read them yet.

In case you'd like to read these too, next to each book is its catalog entry (so you can put it on hold), a link to a summary of the book, and where you can find it as an e-book or e-audiobook, if applicable — Libby (L) and/or Hoopla (H).

Something You've Always Wanted to Read

(L = Libby, H = Hoopla)

Marnie:

A Rip Through Time by Kelley Armstrong
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Dark Lake by Sarah Bailey
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Seaplane on Final Approach by Rebecca Rukeyser
( catalog entry | summary  )

I Am Not a Serial Killer by Dan Wells
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

D'Lacey:

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
( catalog entry | summary | L )

"My favorite genre is the classic Gothic novel. Especially any time there is an old, slightly decrepit English manor house in the countryside, whispers of long-dead former residents, things that go bump in the night, and lots of dark family secrets. And while I have started Rebecca many times, I have never actually finished this book! Can I really say I love the Gothic novel genre if I haven't read Rebecca?!?"

The Secret History by Donna Tartt
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"Dark academia is one of my favorite sub-genres, and as this book is considered the OG dark academia novel, it has been on my TBR for years! It is LONG though, so it has just been a matter of mentally setting aside time to actually start it!"

Christine:

Hail Mary: The Rise and Fall of the National Women's Football League by Frankie de la Cretaz and Lyndsey D’Arcangelo
( catalog entry | summary  )

"Always count me in for a new book about women's sports."

Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language by Gretchen McCulloch
( catalog entry | summary | L )

"I love the idea of tracing the linguistic history of internet speak."

Late to the Party by Kelly Quindlen
( catalog entry | summary | H )

"Someone whose taste I trust recommended this to me a long time ago, I just haven't read it yet!"

Amber:

Wild by Cheryl Strayed
( catalog entry | summary | L )

"Don’t tell Reese Witherspoon!"

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"I have always wanted to read this book for its classicness as a Gothic novel. The story is just so intriguing."

Meghan:

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett
( catalog entry | summary | L )

People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"These are popular books I see around a lot and just never got around to reading."

Callahan:

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
( catalog entry | summary  )

The Shadow of What Was Lost by James Islington
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Nancy:

The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Books by Edward Rutherfurd
( catalog entry | summaries | L, H )

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"They all seem too daunting."

Sandra:

The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"This book was a success in Brazil (where the author and I are from) in the early ’90s. Maybe the story didn't appeal to me at the time. Now that I am (a little bit) older, I will give it a try."

John:

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"Flaubert was tried for 'offenses against morality and religion,' so it must be good."

Finnegans Wake by James Joyce
( catalog entry | summary | H )

"I can envision tackling Finnegans Wake but I am afraid I might not be smart enough (horrible yet valid excuse)."

Cassie:

The Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

On the Road by Jack Kerouac
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Godfather by Mario Puzo
( catalog entry | summary | L )

Walden by Henry David Thoreau
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
( catalog entry | summary | L )

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

Susan:

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
( catalog entry | summary | L, H )

"I want to read this because it is about the power of a single act of kindness."


If you're participating in summer reading with a paper reading log, don't forget to bring it to the Reference Desk by August 2. If you've joined us on Beanstack, make sure you've earned the Summer Reading Champ badge so you're eligible for prizes. Happy reading!